001. Disneyland Guide
 
 
COMPLETE
(January 07, 2008)

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DISNEYLAND
1950
- 1953 SPECIALS

Special 001

One Hour in Wonderland

December 25, 1950

The Studio’s first experiment with television features a party to celebrate the upcoming animated release Alice in Wonderland. Walt hosts the program, which includes scenes from earlier films and a behind-the-scenes look at Alice.

60 min. Directed by Richard Wallace.

Special 002

Operation Wonderland [NBC]

June 14, 1951

This segment starts at the NBC studios in New York, where host James Melton says that his daughter asked him to find out everything he could about Walt Disney’s new picture, Alice in Wonderland. Glad to oblige, he went to Burbank to meet Walt and his staff for a special look at how the film was made. The rest of the segment is a flashback of Melton’s trip.

This segment was aired as part of the Ford Festival  television series.

10 min.

Special 003

The Walt Disney Christmas Show

December 25, 1951 

The Studio’s second television program opens in the children’s ward of a large hospital as Dr. Miller entertains the patients by dressing as Santa Claus. This will be a special Christmas, for “Santa” has arranged, through the magic of television, for the children to attend a special party being held at the Disney Studio.

60 min. Directed by Robert Florey.

Special 004

Toast of the Town

February 08, 1953 

This special begins in New York. After reminiscing about meeting Walt Disney during the making of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Ed Sullivan mentions that it is Mickey Mouse’s 25th anniversary. Wanting to see Walt again, he visited the Studio to salute the creator of the world’s most famous mouse. Films follow showing Ed’s trip to California.

This special was part of Ed Sullivan’s variety show.

This program is also known as The Walt Disney Story.

60 min

DISNEYLAND
1954 - 1955 SEASON
ABC, WEDNESDAY,
7:30 PM, 1-HOUR FORMAT 

Episode 001

The Disneyland Story

October 27, 1954

In this, the opening show of the Disneyland television series, Walt presents a preview of the upcoming, beginning with a brief tour of the studio.

The second part of the show looks at the career of Mickey Mouse.

This show is also known as What Is Disneyland?

The second part of the episode is titled A Tribute to Mickey Mouse, and was later used in the show The Pre-Opening Report on Disneyland (and) A Tribute to Mickey Mouse.

Directed by Robert Florey.

Episode 002

Alice in Wonderland

November 03, 1954

April 06, 1955

January 09, 1957

December 25, 1959

December 20, 1964

This animated version of Lewis Carroll’s The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass was released theatrically in 1951.

In addition to Walt Disney, the 1954 and 1955 broadcasts featured James Algar and Winston Hibler. The following songs were cut from the television version in order to fit the one-hour format: In a World of My Own and Very Good Advice.

Directed by Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton Luske, Wilfred Jackson.

Episode 003

Prairie (and) Seal Island

November 10, 1954

March 23, 1955

July 06, 1955

April 28, 1963

James Algar describes some of the tricks the Disney photographers must use to capture the lives of animals in their native habitats. The next portion of the show features animals from the prairies of North America, detailing their lives through the seasons of a typical year.

Finally, Winston Hibler narrates the theatrical release Seal Island as the show moves northward to Alaska and the Pribilof Islands, the migratory home of the fur seal.

Directed by James Algar, Richard Bare.

Episode 004

The Donald Duck Story

November 17, 1954

April 20, 1955

August 31, 1955

Walt explains the creation of Donald Duck, using a scrapbook filled with highlights of Donald’s career.

This episode is also known as The Story of Donald Duck.

Directed by Jack Hannah, Robert Florey.

Episode 005

So Dear to My Heart

November 24, 1954

January 02, 1957

This 1949 theatrical release starring Bobby Driscoll and Burl Ives is the story of a young boy’s efforts to raise a black lamb and exhibit it at the county fair.

It was adapted for television by Bill Walsh and Al Teeter.

Directed by Harold Schuster.

Episode 006

A Story of Dogs

December 01, 1954

May 25, 1955

July 20, 1955

The first part of the show is devoted to the Studio’s upcoming animated feature film, Lady and the Tramp.

In the second part of the episode, Walt produces a scrapbook that shows the progress of Pluto’ career.

Directed by Clyde Geronimi, C. August Nichols, Robert Florey.

Episode 007

Operation Undersea

December 08, 1954

March 16, 1955

June 29, 1955

August 25, 1963

April 04, 1971

Walt tells how he became interested in the undersea world during the preparations for filming of Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues under the Sea, the studio’s latest live-action film. Several new film techniques had to be perfected, often under difficult conditions. Winston Hibler tells the story of his unusual film project.

Emmy Award:  1955: Best Individual Show, 1954

Emmy Award:  1955: Best Television Film Editing (Grant Smith, Lynn Harrison)

Portions of this show were later used in the episode Pacifically Peeking (1968).

Directed by Winston Hibler, Hamilton Luske.

Episode 008

Davy Crockett - Indian Fighter [1 of 5]

December 15, 1954

April 13, 1955

September 12, 1958

September 08, 1963

August 24, 1969

August 25, 1974

 

Reading from “Davy Crockett’s Journal”, Walt introduces the story of the American folk hero and unknowingly starts a national craze. The characters and plot of the show are introduced in a popular song (The Ballad of Davy Crockett) that was used throughout the Crockett TV episodes. In this outing, Davy arranges for a truce with the Indians.

This episode was edited into the 1955 theatrical release Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier, along with scenes from Davy Crockett Goes to Congress and Davy Crockett at the Alamo.

Chester Schaeffer was nominated for an Emmy award for Best Television Film Editing for this episode.

The whole three episodes together received an Emmy Award for Best Action or Adventure Series of 1955.

Directed by Norman Foster.

Episode 009

A Present for Donald

December 22, 1954

December 19, 1956

December 26, 1965

December 24, 1972

The show opens with Walt Disney in his office, which is gaily decorated for the holiday season. He mentions a package that arrived for Donald Duck. Donald arrives to open the gift, which contains a movie projector and a reel of film. He’s soon watching the story of Pablo, a strange penguin who tries to leave that cold weather of the South Pole in search of a warmer climate.

This show consisted almost entirely of footage from the 1945 theatrical release The Three Caballeros. Although the 1954 credits list one of the characters as “Joe” Carioca, the correct name is Jose.

Episode 010

Beaver Valley (and) Cameras in Africa

December 29, 1954

June 01, 1955

August 24, 1955

Walt introduces noted wildlife photographer Alfred Milotte, who has recently returned from an expedition to Africa where he and his wife, Elma, spent over two years filming the stories of the African lion and elephant. Milotte shows some scenes of rampaging rhinos, a cheetah racing at over 80 miles an hour, and the animals of the Serengeti Plain.

Part two of the program is another True-Life Adventure, Beaver Valley.

Some of the footage Milotte shows was later used in the True-Life Adventure feature The African Lion.

Repeat broadcast of this episode were aired as Cameras in Africa (and) Beaver Valley.

Directed by Winston Hibler, James Algar.

Episode 011

Treasure Island - Part 1

January 05, 1955

November 28, 1956

April 29, 1962

July 13, 1980

April 17, 1982

Robert Lewis Stevenson’s classic tale of a young boy who becomes involved with pirates and buried treasure was originally theatrical released in 1950.

It was adapted for television by Bill Walsh and Al Teeter.

Directed by Byron Haskin.

Episode 012

Treasure Island - Part 2

January 12, 1955

December 05, 1956

May 06, 1962

July 20, 1980

April 24, 1982

Robert Lewis Stevenson’s classic tale of a young boy who becomes involved with pirates and buried treasure was originally theatrical released in 1950.

It was adapted for television by Bill Walsh and Al Teeter.

Directed by Byron Haskin.

Episode 013

Monsters of the Deep

January 19, 1955

March 30, 1955

July 27, 1955

The show is devoted to strange creatures: Walt takes the viewer into his “Monster Room” at the studio. The material stored here is used to provide details on creatures of all sorts, including many known only to the Disney artists.

Guests in this episode are Kirk Douglas and Peter Lorre.

Directed by Hamilton Luske, Peter Godfrey.

Episode 014

Davy Crockett Goes to Congress [2 of 5]

January 26, 1955

April 27, 1955

September 19, 1958

September 15, 1963

August 31, 1969

September 01, 1974

The second episode of the Crockett trilogy finds Davy bored with his life. He and George travel to a sparsely settled portion of Tennessee, hoping to resettle there with their families. Satisfied with the location, they go to a nearby town to file their claims. When Davy beats the town bully, Big Foot Mason, in a shooting match, the local judge asks Davy to become the town’s lawman, as no one else has bested Mason to date. Crockett declines but is soon forced to change his mind.

Together with the episodes Davy Crockett – Indian Fighter and Davy Crockett at the Alamo, this show was edited into the 1955 theatrical release, Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier.

The whole three episodes together received an Emmy Award for Best Action or Adventure Series of 1955.

Directed by Norman Foster.

Episode 015

Wind in the Willows

February 02, 1955

May 18, 1955

August 03, 1955

May 22, 1959

May 02, 1965

Walt devotes this hour to the British writer of children’s tales, Kenneth Grahame. The creator of Mr. Toad and many other famous characters has long been a favorite of Walt’s, who first used one of his stories in the 1941 film, The Reluctant Dragon.

 

Episode 016

A Progress Report (and) Nature's Half Acre

February 09, 1955

May 04, 1955

Work continues on the Disneyland theme park as Walt narrates the first half of this show, which provides a look at the construction progress.

The second part is the True-Life Adventure film Nature’s Half Acre.

Directed by Winston Hibler, Al Teeter.

Episode 017

Cavalcade of Songs

February 16, 1955

June 22, 1955

August 17, 1955

September 16, 1962

December 26, 1971

The importance of music in motion pictures is this episode’s theme as Walt discusses some of the more important tunes featured in his films over the years and promotes the upcoming Lady and the Tramp by showing segments of the work in progress and looking in on the composers and singers work on the score.

Directed by Wilfred Jackson, Peter Godfrey.

Episode 018

Davy Crockett at the Alamo [3 of 5]

February 23, 1955

May 11, 1955

September 26, 1958

September 22, 1963

September 07, 1969

September 08, 1974

The concluding chapter of the original Crockett trilogy finds Davy and George heading westward looking for new adventure. Sailing aboard a Mississippi River steamer, they meet a gambler named Thimblerig, who asks to join them when some of his victims discover he’s a cheat. The trio sets course for Texas, where Davy intends to join the fight against the Mexican army led by Gen. Santa Anna.

Although Crockett was killed in this episode, Disney brought the Western hero back the next season in two additional episodes that were set earlier in his life.

This episode was also used in the 1955 theatrical release Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier, along with scenes from Davy Crockett – Indian Fighter and Davy Crockett Goes to Congress.

The whole three episodes together received an Emmy Award for Best Action or Adventure Series of 1955.

Directed by Norman Foster.

Episode 019

From Aesop to Hans Christian Andersen

March 02, 1955

June 08, 1955

August 10, 1955

May 01, 1966

The age-old art of storytelling is featured as Disney presents an all-cartoon tribute to several classic tales.

From Aesop to Hans Christian Anderson was released theatrically overseas in 1958.

Directed by Clyde Geronimi.

Episode 020

Man in Space

March 09, 1955

June 15, 1955

September 07, 1955

September 18, 1959

The first of the Tomorrowland shows is a look at how America is preparing for the challenge of space exploration. After a look at early experiments in rocketry, the show provides a look at the problems that must be overcome before mankind can travel safely in space.

Man in Space was released theatrically in 1956.´

Aired in 1959 as a “Special Science Program”.

Directed by Ward Kimball.

Episode 021

Pre-Opening Report from Disneyland (and) A Tribute to Mickey Mouse

July 13, 1955

With the opening of Disneyland only days away, Walt provides a final look at the many details necessary to ensure that the Park will be ready. He begins by showing the audience a large map of the site, then introduces Winston Hibler, who tells how Studio technicians went about designing and building the unusual rides and shows about to open.

The second part of the show looks at the career of Mickey Mouse.

This episode is also known as A Further Report on Disneyland.

The second half of this show was originally aired as part of The Disneyland Story.

Cartoon Sequences directed by Wilfred Jackson.

DISNEYLAND
1955 SPECIAL

Special 005

Dateline: Disneyland

July 17, 1955 

Following many months of construction and at a cost of $17 million, Walt Disney’s dream, Disneyland has its opening day celebrated in this live broadcast. Hosted by Art Linkletter, Bob Cummings, and Ronald Reagon, it features many Hollywood personalities and politicians who have gathered to honor Walt and to enjoy the Park’s attractions. The opening comments are by reporter Hank Weaver, who is sitting in a very busy newsroom as reporters rush to let the world know about Disneyland. As the show closes, Walt thanks all of the workers who helped make his dream come true, then heads into Fantasyland with Linkletter to have some fun.

This show was watched by an estimated 90 million viewers.

90 min. Directed by Stuart Phelps, John Rich.

DISNEYLAND
195
5 - 1956 SEASON
ABC, WEDNESDAY,
7:30 PM, 1-HOUR FORMAT 

Episode 022

Dumbo

September 08, 1955

December 21, 1955

December 25, 1957

December 29, 1963

September 17, 1978

This 1941 theatrical release is the story of a circus elephant with huge ears who discovers he can fly.

The 1955 airing carried the credit “Adapted for Television by: Ben Sharpsteen, Wilfred Jackson, Harry Tyle.

The 1978 version was part of the special NBC Salutes the 25th Anniversary of The Wonderful World of Disney and aired as a two-hour special.

Dumbo was also included in the anthology episode A Disney Storybook (1981).

Directed by Ben Sharpsteen.

Episode 023

Behind the True-Life Cameras (and) Olympic Elk

September 21, 1955

November 23, 1955

June 20, 1956

In another behind-the-scenes visit to the True-Life Adventure series, Walt introduces James Algar, writer and director of the series. For a look at the filming of Secrets of Life, Algar takes viewers to the Everglades, where photographers Clare and Bill Anderson have been filming the local inhabitants. He then takes us to a desert where photographer Bob Crandall is documenting the lives of a colony of leaf cutter ants.

The second part is the True-Life Adventure film Olympic Elk.

Directed by Winston Hibler, James Algar.

Episode 024

Jiminy Cricket Presents Bongo

September 28, 1955

May 08, 1959

In an excerpt from the 1947 animated feature Fun and Fancy Free, Jiminy tells the story of Bongo, a lonely circus bear. Although he’s the star of the show, poor Bongo is treated like a slave, kept locked away from the other animals. Longing for a more adventurous life, Bongo escapes to the forest. Quickly frightened by the night noises, he decides to head back to the circus. On his way, however, he meets and falls in love with a female bear named Lulubelle.

Then Jiminy introduces the stories Chicken Little and Figaro and Cleo.

Directed by Hamilton S. Luske.

Episode 025

People and Places - Tiburon, Sardinia, Morocco (and) Icebreakers

October 05, 1955

April 18, 1956

July 04, 1956

This episode is comprised of three short subjects from the People and Places series and one that was never completed: Tiburon, which took William N. Smith four years to film, is an island in the Gulf of California inhabited by a tribe of Native Americans.

The Tiburon footage was only used in this show.

Directed by Winston Hibler.

Episode 026

Adventures of Mickey Mouse

October 12, 1955

January 20, 1980

September 07, 1980

In this episode, Walt takes a look at the career of his longtime associate, Mickey Mouse. Cartoons included: The Band Concert, Alpine Climbers, Squatter’s Right and Mickey and the Beanstalk.

The 1955 version of the show ends with the giant from Mickey and the Beanstalk still looking for Mickey, picking up the Studio roof and asking Walt if he’s seen the mouse. This ending was omitted following Walt’s death.

This episode aired as Mickey’s Greatest Adventures in 1980.

Major portions of this show were used in the syndicated episode Adventures with Mickey

Directed by Jack Hannah, Bill Roberts.

Episode 027

The Story of the Silly Symphony

October 19, 1955

April 11, 1956

June 05, 1959

Walt takes a look backward at the Silly Symphony cartoon series, explaining that many of the techniques used in the Studio’s animated features were first perfected in those short subjects.

Directed by Clyde Geronimi.

Episode 028

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

October 26, 1955

October 30, 1957

October 31, 1965

January 25, 1976

Animation is used to provide a brief biographical look at Washington Irving, who grew up in the Hudson River region of New York State.

Of all his stories, Walt feels The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is the most famous. In the film The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad, Disney animators brought to life the character of Ichabod Crane, the eccentric schoolteacher who unfortunately makes an enemy of the town bully, Brom Bones, and is menaced by the terrifying Headless Horseman.

Directed by Clyde Geronimi.

Episode 029

The Story of Robin Hood - Part 1

November 02, 1955

December 26, 1958

May 16, 1965

This 1952 theatrical release starring Richard Todd, Joan Rice, and Peter Finch tells the story of how a gamekeeper’s son became the legendary bandit, Robin Hood.

It was adapted for television by Bill Walsh, Al Teeter, and Lee Chanery.

Directed by Ken Annakin.

Episode 030

The Story of Robin Hood - Part 2

November 09, 1955

January 02, 1959

May 23, 1965

This 1952 theatrical release starring Richard Todd, Joan Rice, and Peter Finch tells the story of how a gamekeeper’s son became the legendary bandit, Robin Hood.

It was adapted for television by Bill Walsh, Al Teeter, and Lee Chanery.

Directed by Ken Annakin.

Episode 031

Davy Crockett's Keelboat Race [4 of 5]

November 16, 1955

January 25, 1956

September 25, 1960

September 06, 1964

September 03, 1972

September 12, 1976

The Crockett saga continues with Davy and George ending a season of trapping and hunting, eager to bring the hides to market. Their plans for an easy sale are quickly thwarted when they try to ship the hides down the Ohio River, and the self-styled “King of the River”, mike Fink, attempts to charge them an outrageous price.

This episode was included in the 1956 theatrical release, Davy Crockett and the River Pirates.

At the end of filming, both the “Bertha Mae” and the “Gullywhumper”, were put into service at Disneyland, as the “Mike Fink Keelboats”.

Directed by Norman Foster.

Episode 032

The Story of the Animated Drawing

November 30, 1955

April 25, 1956

July 25, 1956

This history of animation begins in 1906, when J. Stuart Blackton produced a short subject named Humorous Phases of Funny Faces, using chalk drawings that were erased and redrawn for each frame of film. At that stage, the primary method of animation was use cut-out figures or to redraw the entire scene each time, as in Winsor McCay’s Gertie the Dinosaur. More animation pioneers are profiled throughout the show.

Portions of this episode were released as the educational featurette The History of Animation.

Directed by Wilfred Jackson, William Beaudine.

Episode 033

The Goofy Success Story

December 07, 1955

April 08, 1960

This episode highlights Goofy’s rise to stardom. It starts with a look at Hollywood, where talent scouts hide everywhere, all looking for the next superstar. Sitting high in a theater balcony, Goofy starts to laugh at a Mickey Mouse cartoon and finds himself “discovered”. After that, it’s a quick trip down easy street for the owner of the world’s most unusual laugh, leading to several cartoons of his own like Moving Day, Moose Hunters, How to Ride a Horse and Motor Mania.

Released theatrically overseas in 1959.

Directed by Jack Kinney.

Episode 034

Davy Crockett and The River Pirates [5 of 5]

December 14, 1955

February 22, 1956

October 02, 1960

September 13, 1964

September 10, 1972

September 19, 1976

The fifth and final episode in the original Crockett saga finds Davy and George out to clear the name of some Indian friends who have been accused of raiding boats traveling on the Ohio River. They recruit the aid of their friend, Mike Fink, and head upriver. Waiting for them is a gang of pirates led by the evil Harpe brothers, who have been impersonating the Indians to disguise the looting.

This episode was edited into the 1956 theatrical release of the same name, using additional footage from the episode Davy Crockett’s Keelboat Race.

This episode was nominated for an Emmy Award as the Best Single Program of the Year.

Directed by Norman Foster.

Episode 035

Man and the Moon

December 28, 1955

June 13, 1956

September 25, 1959

Ward Kimball, the show’s director, starts off with a cartoon illustrating age-old legends and fantasies about the moon. Many of these stories involved fanciful ways to travel to the moon, predictions of the creatures that supposedly roamed its surface, or folktales about how the moon influenced events on Earth.

Aired in 1959 as a “Special Science Program” under the name Tomorrow the Moon.

This episode was released theatrically overseas.

Directed by Ward Kimball.

Episode 036

When Knighthood Was in Flower - Part 1

January 04, 1956

July 11, 1956

April 07, 1963

Released theatrically 1953 as The Sword and the Rose,  this film stars Glynis Johns, Richard Todd, and James Robertson Justice in the story of two noblemen who develop an interest in King Henry VIII’s sister.

It was adapted for television by Bill Walsh, Al Teeter, and Lee Chaney.

Directed by Ken Annakin.

Episode 037

When Knighthood Was in Flower - Part 2

January 11, 1956

July 18, 1956

April 14, 1963

Released theatrically 1953 as The Sword and the Rose,  this film stars Glynis Johns, Richard Todd, and James Robertson Justice in the story of two noblemen who develop an interest in King Henry VIII’s sister.

It was adapted for television by Bill Walsh, Al Teeter, and Lee Chaney.

Directed by Ken Annakin.

Episode 038

A Tribute to Joel Chandler Harris

January 18, 1956

March 28, 1956

June 27, 1956

This show salutes American storyteller Joel Chandler Harris, famous for several works, including the Uncle Remus stories featuring Song of the South. A live-action re-creation of Harris’s early years shows how he first became interested in writing. The episode ends with the Tar Baby sequence from Song of the South.

Directed by William Beaudine, Clyde Geronimi.

Episode 039

A Day in the Life of Donald Duck

February 01, 1956

May 09, 1956

Explaining that he’s received many letters about Donald Duck, Walt relates a typical working day for the feathered star.

Directed by Jack Hannah.

Episode 040

Survival in Nature

February 08, 1956

May 16, 1956

August 08, 1956

June 02, 1963

Winston Hibler narrates this program about how animals must continually adept to increase their chances for survival.

Directed by Winston Hibler.

Episode 041

Our Unsung Villains

February 15, 1956

June 10, 1960

 

The Slave in the Magic Mirror hosts this tribute to Disney’s villains, for he claims that without them, no one would need heroes.

Directed by Hamilton S. Luske.

Episode 042

A Trip Thru Adventureland (and) Water Birds

February 29, 1956

May 02, 1956

September 05, 1956

 

The first portion of this show is a trip through the Adventureland section of Disneyland, with a special look at the popular Jungle Cruise attraction.

The second part of the show is an edited version of the 1952 Academy Award winner, Water Birds. Winston Hibler narrates this look at the many types of birds that live in aquatic locales.

Water Birds was also aired as part of the episode Escape to Paradise (and) Water Birds (1960).

Directed by Winston Hibler.

Episode 043

On Vacation

March 07, 1956

August 19, 1960

June 28, 1968

August 07, 1977

April 11, 1979

Jiminy Cricket hosts this animated look at Mickey, Donald, and Goofy as they go on vacation.

This episode aired 1977 and as a special in 1979 under the title On Vacation with Mickey Mouse and Friends.

Footage from this episode was also used in The Making of Mickey’s Christmas Carol, aired on The Disney Channel.

Directed by Jack Hannah.

Episode 044

Stormy the Thoroughbred

March 14, 1956

May 07, 1958

March 31, 1963

This 1954 theatrical release is the story of Stormy, a thoroughbred colt who is much younger than the other colts in his class and thus unlikely to ever win a race.

The full theatrical title was Stormy, the Thoroughbred with an Inferiority Complex, and was originally narrated by George Fenneman, the television version was narrated by Winston Hibler.

Directed by Larry Lansburgh.

Episode 045

The Goofy Sports Story

March 21, 1956

May 23, 1956

August 29, 1956

July 31, 1959

July 30, 1972

Walt introduces the narrator, Spyros Olympopolus, to demonstrate how many of the ancient sports practiced in foreign countries have evolved into games we enjoy today. Spyros illustrates this by using Goofy, who has tried almost every form of exercise at one time or another.

Footage from this episode was also used in the show Superstar Goofy (1976).

Released theatrically overseas in 1964.

Directed by Wolfgang Reitherman.

Episode 046

Where Do the Stories Come From?

April 04, 1956

June 06, 1956

 

In response to an often asked question, Walt Disney explains how the hobbies of his staff provide ideas for cartoons. Crazy Over Daisy was born from a song written by composer Oliver Wallace. The True-Life Adventure films led to R’Coon Dwag, and wartime experiences of the staff led to a number of cartoons featuring Donald Duck. The scale-model train hobbies of animators Ward Kimball and Ollie Johnston, and of Walt Disney himself, led to Out of Scale. Footage is shown of Disney’s backyard train, the Carolwood-Pacific Railroad.

Directed by Jack Hannah.

Episode 047

Behind the Scenes with Fess Parker

May 30, 1956

August 01, 1956

 

Walt introduces Fess Parker, who tells about the filming of The Great Locomotive Chase. Fess discusses the history of railroads and their importance for carrying troops and equipment during a war. He then tells of the true story on which the movie is based, a tale of twenty Union soldiers who traveled behind Confederate lines on a mission so vital that they were later honored with the first Congressional Medals of Honor.

Directed by Francis D. Lyon.

DISNEYLAND
195
6 - 1957 SEASON
ABC, WEDNESDAY,
7:30 PM, 1-HOUR FORMAT 

Episode 048

Antarctica – Past and Present

September 12, 1956

May 15, 1957

This is the story of “Operation Deepfreeze” a navy expedition to the South Pole. Walt explains that Disney cameramen will travel with the navy crews to provide periodic reports throughout the year-long project. The remainder of the show is hosted by Winston Hibler, who presents a brief history of the region to be explored.

This episode along, with scenes from Antarctica – Operation Deepfreeze and To the South Pole for Science, was edited into the 1958 theatrical release Seven Cities of Antarctica.

Directed by Winston Hibler.

Episode 049

The Great Family Cat

September 19, 1956

March 13, 1957

December 24, 1961

Opinions about cats are often divided. Some people love them, some hate them. Many people just fear them, for cats have gained a reputation that makes superstitious people reluctant to cross their paths. This look at the history of cats begins with the story of their ancestors in Egypt over 4,000 years ago.

Portions of this episode were used in the episode Halloween Hall o’Fame (1977).

Directed by Clyde Geronimi.

Episode 050

Searching for Nature’s Mysteries

September 26, 1956

December 26, 1956

January 02, 1966

Winston Hibler explains how Disney nature photographers have developed the tools and techniques used in productions such as Secrets of Life. Many of the special cameras were designed and built for specific tasks, including equipment used to photograph small animals such as ants.

Directed by Winston Hibler.

Episode 051

Rob Roy – Part 1

October 03, 1956

This story was released theatrically in 1954 as Rob Roy, The Highland Rogue. Footage from the Mickey Mouse Club Newsreel shows scenes of bagpipers preparing for a traditional Scottish celebration. Animated scenes from So Dear to My Heart illustrate a Scot’s persistence in achieving a goal, no matter how difficult the effort may be.

The rest of the episode tells the story of Rob Roy, a famous Scottish warrior.

Directed by Harold French.

Episode 052

Rob Roy – Part 2

October 10, 1956

The episode continues to tell the story of Rob Roy, a famous Scottish warrior.

Directed by Harold French.

Episode 053

Goofy’s Cavalcade of Sports

October 17, 1956

February 06, 1957

The wide variety of sports enjoyed today is demonstrated by Goofy as he attempts to participate in a number of athletic activities. Walt explains that many of these sports were derived from our earlier needs to stay physically fit to fight wars and find food, and they still are used today to test human endurance.

Footage from this episode was also used in the show Superstar Goofy (1976).

Directed by Wolfgang Reitherman.

Episode 054

Behind the Cameras in Lapland (and) The Alaskan Eskimos

October 24, 1956

June 26, 1957

The True-Life Adventure crew heads for Lapland, a frigid area in northern Europe where huge herds of reindeer spend the winter in the lowlands. The annual migration to the summer pastures in the north has just begun, and the Lapland natives are preparing to move along with the herds. The Lapps are a nomadic people with a simple life that greatly depends on the reindeer, but they seem content with life even in this harsh environment.

The second half is the Academy Award winning short The Alaskan Eskimo.

Directed by Winston Hibler and James Algar.

Episode 055

The Plausible Impossible

October 31, 1956

May 22, 1957

October 09, 1960

What is a “plausible impossible”? Walt explains it as something that is impossible in real life but can be convincingly portrayed in some manner. He opens a forthcoming book entitled “The Art of Animation” and shows examples of this technique that date back to the ancient Egyptians and Greeks.

Directed by Wilfred Jackson, William Beaudine.

Episode 056

Cameras in Samoa (and) The Holland Story

November 07, 1956

July 10, 1957

Winston Hibler narrates a behind-the-scenes look at Disney camera team Herbert and Trudi Knapp, who are in Samoa filming a segment of the People and Places series.

The show then takes a look at life in Holland. The dangers of living in an area separated from the sea by huge dikes are shown as a break in the protective wall is repaired.

Directed by Winston Hibler.

Episode 057

Along the Oregon Trail

November 14, 1956

February 20, 1957

Walt begins the show by describing the famed Oregon Trail, a route favored by pioneers heading to the West. The journey was not an easy one, taking six months to cross from Kansas City to Oregon, but hundreds of wagon trains successfully completed the trip. The movie Westward Ho the Wagons! is the story of one such trip, and this behind-the-scenes look at its filming is hosted by Fess Parker, star of the film.

Directed by William Beaudine.

Episode 058

At Home with Donald Duck

November 21, 1956

May 08, 1957

May 20, 1962

April 16, 1972

November 07, 1976

April 04, 1979

What should normally be a pleasant day – one’s birthday – soon leads to problems in the Duck household. Donald decides to give his nephews a party for his own birthday, complete with cake and ice cream. As a special treat, he decides to show movies – all about himself.

Aired in 1976 and as a special in 1979, on NBC, under the title Happy Birthday Donald Duck.

Directed by Jack Hannah.

Episode 059

Pluto’s Day

December 12, 1956

August 07, 1957

July 03, 1959

April 06, 1980

January 18, 1981

Walt opens the show by displaying an award won by Pluto for being “the most promising dog actor”, remarking that Pluto achieved his success by just being himself. To demonstrate this, Walt presents a typical day in Pluto’s life.

Directed by Wolfgang Reitherman.

Episode 060

Your Host – Donald Duck

January 16, 1957

July 17, 1957

Donald Duck announces his plan for a specil episode to be entitled “The Duckland Four-in-One Show”. Several animated clips are shown as Donald travels through Adventureland, Frontierland, Tomorrowland, and Fantasyland.

Directed by Jack Hannah.

Episode 061

Our Friend the Atom

January 23, 1957

April 24, 1957

Dr. Heinz Haber, a noted scientist in the field of atomic energy, hosts his look at what may be an exciting new power source. Haber begins by comparing atomic energy to a genie in a bottle. Both are capable of doing either tremendous good or unbelievable evil, and it is up to humankind to develop safe controls over this largely unexpected science.

Disney had originally planned a show titled Adam to Atom on the subject of atomic energy, but the show was canceled and some of the material was incorporated in this episode.

Released theatrically overseas in 1958.

Directed by Hamilton S. Luske.

Episode 062

All About Magic

January 30, 1957

June 12, 1957

October 23, 1960

This hour is devoted to the art of magic, so Walt goes to the studio basement, where the Magic Mirror from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs is stored. In fact, the whole room is filled with magic props, such as an old standby, the “Magic Hat”. Walt summons the Spirit of the mirror and turns the show over to him, bowing to his greater experience.

Directed by Hamilton S. Luske.

Episode 063

Tricks of Our Trade

February 13, 1957

July 03, 1957

This episode takes a look at the science of animation, where there are many complex principles at work for every movement seen on the screen. Like many other sciences, animation techniques were developed both to solve specific problems and for general knowledge.

An edited version of this show was released by Disney’s educational division.

Directed by Wilfred Jackson.

Episode 064

The Crisler Story (and) Prowlers of the Everglades

February 27, 1957

June 19, 1957

August 12, 1960

Narrator Winston Hibler tells about the problems the Crislers encountered in the filming of The Arctic Wilderness (released as White Wilderness). The Crislers are a team of photographers sent to Alaska to film the annual fall caribou migration.

Prowlers of the Everglades, a True-Life Adventure first released theatrically in 1953, ends the show with a look at the alligators that inhabit the Florida Everglades.

Directed by James Algar.

Episode 065

Man in Flight

March 06, 1957

April 02, 1958

March 26, 1961

There are two versions of this show, with the 1957-58 season version providing a more detailed look at past aviation concepts and experiments.

For the 1961 airing, the show was modified to provide publicity for the theatrical release The Absent-Minded Professor.

Both versions made extensive use of an educational short subject, The History of Aviation, which in turn includes numerous sequences from the theatrical feature Victory Through Air Power.

The scenes from Victory Through Air Power featured new narration written for the show.

Released theatrically overseas.

Directed by Hamilton S. Luske.

Episode 066

The Adventure Story

March 20, 1957

September 04, 1957

Stating that everyone likes an adventure story, Walt presents a rather unusual one. It’s not a story of any classic adventure known to the average historian – rather, it’s the saga of the Goofy family’s exploits throughout the ages.

New animation of fictional Goofy relatives was used to tie together five Goofy cartoons.

This show is also known as The Goofy Adventure Story.

Directed by Wolfgang Reitherman.

Episode 067

Donald’s Award

March 27, 1957

August 28, 1957

September 09, 1962

Walt opens the episode by talking about how happy he is to be part of the Studio “family”, even though there is a problem child – Donald Duck. Donald has become so much of a problem that Walt has had to talk to him about it, promising him a good conduct medal if an entire week passes without a complaint about his behavior.

Directed by Jack Hannah.

Episode 068

Disneyland, The Park (and) Pecos Bill

April 03, 1957

August 21, 1957

Walt opens the show by mentioning the importance of American folklore, and promises to tell the story of the legendary Pecos Bill. First, however, he treats the audience to a helicopter ride to Anaheim and the Park.

Directed by Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton S, Luske.

Episode 069

People of the Desert

April 10, 1957

August 06, 1958

 

Life in the desert is not easy, for the harsh climate can kill an unprepared traveler without warning. This show looks t two different cultures that have managed to survive in such areas, the first being the Navajo Indians in Navajo Adventure.

The second half of this episode provides a look at the nomadic wanderers of the desert in the theatrical People and Places featurette, The Blue Men of Morocco.

Navajo Adventure was released theatrically overseas in 1957.

Directed by Ben Sharpsteen, Ralph Wright.

Episode 071

More About the Silly Symphonies

April 17, 1957

Walt explains how the Silly Symphonies served as training for the animators and a chance to experiment with new techniques. The lessons learned in these early days would later be used in the production of full-length features such as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and Fantasia.

Directed by Clyde Geronimi.

Episode 072

The Yellowstone Story (and) Bear Country

May 01, 1957

July 24, 1957

 

The True-Life Adventure series required the Studio’s crew to travel to far-off locations. In filming Bear Country, the photographers were sent to Yellowstone National Park in Montana, which is the subject of this episode.

Bear Country was also aired as part of the episode Rapids Ahead (and) Bear Country (1960) and in 1976 as a special with That Darn Cat!

Directed by James Algar.

Episode 073

The Liberty Story

May 29, 1957

July 31, 195

 

The first part of this episode is excerpted from the 1957 theatrical production Johnny Tremain, featuring a young apprentice silversmith who becomes a member of the outlawed “Sons of Liberty”.

The second part of the show is the 1953 carrtoon Ben and Me, which is told from the point of view of Amos, a church mouse.

Directed by Hamilton S. Luske, Robert Stevenson.

Episode 074

Antarctica – Operation Deepfreeze

June 05, 1957

August 14, 1957

 

The story begun in Antarctica – Past and Present continues with this update on the activities of Navy Task Force 43 and the efforts to explore the Antarctic for the International Geophysical Year. Walt introduces narrator Winston Hibler, who explains the scientific value of the studies being conducted in Antarctica and how the expedition spent their time on the ice.

This episode along, with scenes from Antarctica – Past and Present and To the South Pole for Science, was edited into the 1958 theatrical release Seven Cities of Antarctica.

Directed by Winston Hibler.

DISNEYLAND
195
7 - 1958 SEASON
ABC, WEDNESDAY,
7:30 PM, 1-HOUR FORMAT 

Episode 075

The Fourth Anniversary Show

September 11, 1957

Walt opens this celebration of four years on television by telling how the late Serge Prokofieff played his composition Peter and the Wolf for Walt and how that convinced him to make an animated short subject based on the musical work. In this musical piece an instrument and musical theme are used to denote each of the characters, and the Disney animators had to match their work to the existing soundtrack.

The second part of the show is the actual celebration. It begins with the jubilant arrival of the Mouseketeers, including the stars of the Mickey Mouse Club serials. They pester Walt with questions on what he has planned for future shows, and the surprised studio chief agrees to give them a special preview.

Directed by Sidney Miller.

Episode 076

Four Fabulous Characters

September 18, 1957

August 13, 1958

May 03, 1964

The show is dedicated to the memory of four Americans who have become folk heroes, celebrated in song and story. Jerry Colonna begins with the story of Casey Jones, a railroad engineer, with a penchant for being on time that bordered on fanaticism. The second story is about two famous characters, Henry Martin and Grace Coy, whose story concerns a feud that began so long ago no one even remembers why. Mighty Casey of the “Mudville Nine” is next as the story of one of the world’s most famous baseball players. The final tale is that of John Chapman, better known as “Johnny Appleseed”.

Directed by Hamilton S. Luske.

Episode 077

Adventure in Wildwood Heart

September 25, 1957

December 18, 1957

Walt opens the show in the Studio Morgue, the central area to store data that might be needed in future projects. All the studio’s major films have benefited from the facts and pictures stored there, and he uses clips from several past productions to illustrate his point. Walt then introduces Winston Hibler, who tells how the studio researched and filmed Felix Salten’s story of Perri, soon to be seen in theaters as a True-Life Fantasy

Directed by Hamilton S. Luske.

Episode 078

The Saga of Andy Burnett – Andy’s Initiation [1 of 6]

October 02, 1957

February 05, 1958

Set in 1820 the first part of the saga begins with young Andy Burnett eating dinner in a Pittsburgh tavern. He befriends Joe Crane, a penniless Mountain Man who comes to Andy’s aid when a gang of thugs attacks him. Crane recognizes Andy’s rifle as one made by Daniel Boone, which was given to Gail Burnett, Andy’s grandfather and a true pioneer. Despite such heritage, Andy is heading west to become a farmer – a prospect that dismays Crane. He decides to “persuade” Andy to head into the mountains with him and “borrows” Andy’s money so he doesn’t have a choice.

Directed by Lewis R. Foster.

Episode 079

The Saga of Andy Burnett – Andy’s First Chore [2 of 6]

October 09, 1957

February 12, 1958

The second episode in the saga begins with the Mountain Men teaching Andy to ride like an Indian and to use a bow and arrow. Jack Kelly joins the group, warning them that a band of men led by Bill Sublette is nearby. The Mountain Men become suspicious that the newcomers are attempting to learn the location of their private trapping grounds. Several encounters contribute to a growing dislike between the two groups, which increases when Andy outwits Sublette’s men and is able to get several traps the Mountain Men desperately need.

Directed by Lewis R. Foster.

Episode 080

The Saga of Andy Burnett – Andy’s Love Affair [3 of 6]

October 16, 1957

February 19, 1958

The third segment finds the Mountain Men arriving in New Mexico. The journey across the desert was long and hot, and now they must deal with the Spanish border patrol. The leader of the patrol, a reasonable man, agrees to take Jack Kelly to Santa Fe if the other men will stay in Taos until he returns. Unfortunately, they must go with Capitan Reyes, a self-impressed officer who doesn’t like Yankees.

Directed by Lewis R. Foster.

Episode 081

Duck For Hire

October 23, 1957

June 25, 1958

November 25, 1979

March 08, 1981

July 17, 1982

Donald has decided to quit show business and leaves the studio promising never to return. He goes to the Ajax Employment Agency and soon finds a job as a service station attendant. His first day on the job ends in disaster when he gets mad at his nephews and destroys their car, only to discover he had won it in a raffle.

Following Walt’s death, the show was modified to provide a new narration explaining Donald’s quitting and subsequent return to the studio.

An edited 30-minute version was aired in 1982.

Directed by Jack Hannah.

Episode 082

Adventures in Fantasy

November 06, 1957

May 21, 1958

December 30, 1962

The world of fantasy and its obvious artistic possibilities are the subjects of this episode, where various inanimate objects come to life and provide introductions to several cartoon sequences.

Directed by Bill Justice.

Episode 083

To the South Pole for Science

November 13, 1957

April 23, 1958

The third in a series of looks at International Geophysical Year activities near the South Pole, this episode continues the story begun in Antarctica – Past and Present and Antarctica – Operation Deepfreeze. Set between November 1956 and February 1957, the show details the efforts of scientists to construct five bases in the frigid wasteland.

This episode along, with scenes from Antarctica – Operation Deepfreeze and Antarctica – Past and Present, was edited into the 1958 theatrical release Seven Cities of Antarctica.

Directed by Winston Hibler.

Episode 084

The Best Doggoned Dog in the World

November 20, 1957

March 26, 1958

February 12, 1961

Disney has just completed a movie based on the book Old Yeller. Dorothy McGuire, who stars in the film, tells the audience a few key stories about the movie. The remainder of the show is based on the 1955 theatrical featurette Arizona Sheepdog.

Disney updated the 1961 version of the show to include scenes from the upcoming One-Hundred and One Dalmatians in place of the Old Yeller segment. 

Episode 085

How to Relax

November 27, 1957

September 03, 1958

July 07, 1963

Our entire desire to relax is illustrated by Goofy, who is first seen as a cave dweller making an unusual discovery – his thumb. Making this discovery led to an unfortunate invention called work. Ever since work was discovered, humans have attempted to discover a method of ensuring adequate leisure time.

Directed by Wolfgang Reitherman.

Episode 086

Mars and Beyond

December 04, 1957

June 11, 1958

Walt opens this look at how scientists are planning to explore the planet Mars by introducing an animated look at humankind’s early thoughts on the universe. The segment includes a lighthearted look at how some “adventures” described Martian creatures they claimed to have met or observed, and ends with a spoof of science fiction stories about unidentified flying objects.

Released theatrically in 1957.

The scenes of “Martian Creatures” were also used for the “in-flight movie” on the Mission to Mars attraction at Disneyland.

Directed by Ward Kimball.

Episode 087

The Horse of the West

December 11, 1957

June 04, 1958

May 26, 1963

June 15, 1969

This is the story of The Bay Lady, a quarter horse born on Rex Allen’s ranch. The Bay Lady becomes the favorite filly of Elena Vasquez until the young horse is mistakenly shipped off the ranch to be sold at auction.

Directed by Larry Lansburgh.

Episode 088

Far Away Places – High, Hot and Wet

January 01, 1958

August 20, 1958

Husband-and-wife camera team Herbert and Trudie Knapp are featured in this look at how Disney crews prepare for, and carry out, some of the most difficult photo assignments available. The first sequence is set high in the Andes mountains in Peru, home of the former Inca empire. The next assignment is at sea level, for the Knapps have been sent to the Fiji Islands. The episode is concludes with a visit to Thailand in the 1954 theatrical release Siam.

Directed by Winston Hibler.

Episode 089

Saludos Amigos

January 08, 1958

This 1943 theatrical release is presented as a souvenir of the Disney staff’s trip to South America, where they had gone to record the native customs, songs, and dances.

It was adapted for television by Wilfred Jackson, Jack Speirs, George Gale, A.C.E., Samuel Horta, and Harry Tytle.

Episode 090

Donald’s Weekend

January 15, 1958

August 27, 1958

A typical weekend with Donald Duck is the setting for this episode as he heads home to see his nephews, who are visiting him. On the way home he stops for gas and a friendly attendant gives him passes to the circus, which Donald decides to use as a bribe to control the boys.

Directed by Jack Hannah.

Episode 091

The Littlest Outlaw – Part 1

January 22, 1958

May 24, 1964

This 1955 theatrical release is the story of Conquistador, a prize racehorse stolen from a Mexican general.

Directed by Roberto Galvadon.

Episode 092

The Littlest Outlaw – Part 2

January 29, 1958

May 31, 1964

This 1955 theatrical release is the story of Conquistador, a prize racehorse stolen from a Mexican general.

Directed by Roberto Galvadon.

Episode 093

The Saga of Andy Burnett The Land of Enemies [4 of 6]

February 26, 1958

July 02, 1958

In the fourth installment, Andy and his friends continue their journey to Taos, New Mexico. The experienced travelers among them are nervous for they know they’re now in Indian territory. Their fears prove to be well founded when they are taken prisoners by a band of Indians.

Directed by Lewis R. Foster.

Episode 094

The Saga of Andy Burnett White Man's Medicine [5 of 6]

March 05, 1958

July 09, 1958

 

The fifth chapter continues of the story begun in The Land of Enemies. Andy has used a telescope lens to light a fire by focusing the sun’s rays, thereby making the Indians think he is a friend of the sun god. He then convinces the chief to let them live.

Directed by Lewis R. Foster.

Episode 095

The Saga of Andy Burnett – The Big Council [6 of 6]

March 12, 1958

July 16, 1958

The sixth and final chapter is a continuation of the story begun in The Land of Enemies. While Burnett and his friends are waiting for the Indian council to decide their fate, Mad Wolf is casting spells and calling demons to attack the Mountain Men. Chief Kiasak invites Burnett’s group to enter a series of games and athletic competitions to be held before the council meets. He points out this may be their last chance to make friends with the same warriors sought out by Mad Wolf.

Directed by Lewis R. Foster.

Episode 096

Magic and Music

March 19, 1958

June 18, 1958

May 19, 1963

 

The Slave in the Magic Mirror, first seen in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, hosts the program, which is devoted to the Slave’s favorite subject, the magic of music.

For the 1958 airing of this show, the Pastoral Symphony was shown intact, including several black centaurettes since removed from the theatrical version of Fantasia. The repeat broadcast of 163 was edited to remove these scenes.

Directed by Hamilton S. Luske.

Episode 097

An Adventure in the Magic Kingdom

April 09, 1958

May 28, 1958

Tinker bell’s ability to make people fly is put to the test when she takes the audience on a tour of Disneyland. Using a sprinkle of pixie dust, she flies the viewers over the highways, passes the heliport, circles the Park, and settles in for a landing at Disneyland for a tour of the Park.

This show used portions of the 1956 theatrical release, Disneyland U.S.A.

An edited version of this show was used as a serial during the fourth season of The Mickey Mouse Club.

Directed by Hamilton S. Luske.

Episode 098

Four Tales on a Mouse

April 16, 1958

July 23, 1958

 

Past episodes have shown how Mickey Mouse began his career and rose to stardom, but this show tells how Mickey has helped other Disney performers with their careers. Mickey shares the spotlight with Donald Duck, Pluto, and Minnie.

Directed by Hamilton S. Luske.

Episode 099

An Adventure in Art

April 30, 1958

Realizing that the Disney Studio is seen by many as an artistic trendsetter, Walt spends an hour discussing the various ways different people may interpret the same artistic piece. A book by American painter Robert Henri, “The Art Spirit”, is used throughout the show as a reference, and Walt reveals it has been an inspiration to him for many years.

The section of the show, where four artists painted an old oak tree on Barham Boulevard in Burbank, has been released later as an educational short called 4 Artists Paint 1 Tree.

Directed by Wilfred Jackson, C. August Nichols.

Episode 100

Magic Highway, U.S.A.

May 14, 1958

July 30, 1958

July 29, 1962

 

The importance of America’s highways is the theme of this show, which begins with a look back at the early days of motoring. The first cars had to be driven on roads that barely deserved the name, for they were often little more than rutted cow paths. Each trip became an adventure, since fuel supplies and spare parts were few and far between. Another problem was the lack of useful maps or signposts, sometimes making a planned short drive into an all-day affair.

Directed by Ward Kimball.

 

 
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